Saturday, 4 May 2013


In 2009, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched the Women and Diabetes Programme, to build global support for women living with diabetes. There were an estimated 151 million women with diabetes in 2011 and this number is expected to rise to 275 million by 2030.

As a federation of over 200 MAs in over 160 countries, IDF is in a unique position to promote the women and diabetes agenda.

The Women and Diabetes Programme aims to:

Build the evidence base
Raise global awareness and commitments
Strengthen gender responsive health systems
Empower women as key agents in the fight against diabetes

The aims of the Women and Diabetes Programme are framed within the commitment IDF made to the UN Every Women Every Child initiative, which was launched by the UN Secretary General to put into action the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health:

“The International Diabetes Federation commits to increase recognition of the linkages between diabetes and related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and women and children's health, support the integration of diabetes into existing health systems and maternal and newborn child health initiatives, and empower girls and women to prevent diabetes in current and future generations.


Activities of the Women and Diabetes Programme fit within four broad categories:

Global awareness & advocacy: At the national and global levels, advocate for women and diabetes as a priority global health and development issue

Building the evidence base: Epidemiological, qualitative and health systems research of the direct and indirect burden of diabetes on girls and women

Best practice projects: Combine research and in-the-field interventions to establish models of diagnosis and care for women with diabetes and to improve their health outcomes

Knowledge sharing: Organise and participate in side-events, meetings and conferences with other experts and stakeholders in the field of diabetes".

Living with Diabetes is hard on women and its burden on women is unique because the disease can affect both mothers and their unborn children.

Diabetes can cause difficulties during pregnancy and delivery such as large sized babies, miscarriage or a baby born with birth defects. Women with diabetes are also more likely to have a heart attack, and at a younger age, than women without diabetes.

For women who do not currently have diabetes, pregnancy brings the risk of gestational diabetes. Based on recently announced diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes, it is estimated that gestational diabetes develops in 18 percent of all pregnancies but disappears when a pregnancy is over.

Women who have had gestational diabetes or have given birth to a baby weighting more than 9 pounds are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life

We at the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community believe in Female education and empowerment towards adequate Diabetes care and quality health delievery.
Hence, we plan to motivate 100 females who are ready to raise awareness about Diabetes in their communities.

So if you are a female or a female youth leader passionate about Diabetes Care and Prevention in Nigeria, enthusiastic about change in your community and you wish to create awareness about diabetes in Nigeria via social media thereby reducing its prevalence and the stigma associated with it.

Please feel free to contact us on


International Diabetes Federation
American Diabetes Association

Thursday, 2 May 2013


On the 28th of April The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community and Diabeticare in their usual style had a 1hour tweetchat that aimed at discussing the way forward in diabetes mellitus care in Nigeria.
There has been a progressive increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Nigeria and the burden is expected to increase even more. Considering this fact there is an urgent need to examine our healthcare systems, work on existing programmes for persons with diabetes and effectively implement a process that facilitates accessibility to such.
This discussion that pulled interested participants from Nigeria and beyond was aimed at getting opinions and suggestions that are people oriented towards forging ahead in our clamor for quality health care services and delivery in Nigeria.

Five questions were thrown in the chat.Responses are summarized

1st QUESTION: On a scale of 1-10, how would you rate DM (Diabetes Mellitus) care in Nigeria and why?
Response Given;

Diabetic care in Nigeria is very poor because it is reactive rather than proactive. Prevention should be a key strategy

2nd QUESTION: how do you think NGOs can help with DM care and T2 (type2) DM prevention in your community?

Response Given;

Access to information & education is key. People can be empowered to be advocates for change in their own #diabetes communities
Education is key; insulin without education is like a car without a steering wheel and of course access to supplies is essential: affordability & availability are major issues in many countries, especially rural areas.
NGOs have more ability to influence education in a sustainable fashion and can help through health education programmes and the organisation of peer support groups for affected individuals
Crucial programs need to consider local customs & culture - involving #youth is essential!
Founders of t1 international and 100 campaign (international NGOs dedicated to T1DM CARE and promotion of access to insulin by all by 2022) our partners find it hard to believe that insulin is still so expensive - they believe insulin should be a human right.

3rd QUESTION: How can Health care providers enhance adequate support for people with D (diabetes)?

Response Given;
There should be more awareness and education provided in the communities
Pressure needs to be put on the pharmaceutical Companies - Diabetes is not a money making scheme
Connecting them to others. Empowering people to realize they can live a normal life, without limitations
By working together we can achieve this! We can learn from other movements. Strength in numbers & empowered groups
Individualising the treatment is key. Proper education of patients with Diabetes and making them partners in their own treatment

4th QUESTION: What role can the food, drinks and beverage industry play in DM care and prevention?

Response Given;
The food, drink and beverage industries need to be properly regulated!
Remember type1 is about a lack of insulin nothing to do with food types - watching food groups helps maintain better blood glucose control
Although food, drink & beverage industries do play a role in the lifestyles of people (& co morbidities), more sugar free alternatives of common beverages should be made available

5th QUESTION: In what ways can 'WE' increase community awareness on a large scale?

Response Given;
TV campaigns or radio jingles on Diabetes happen to be important means of mass education and this can be linked to a local community (health/ fitness) prevention event.
Empowering local role models with diabetes.
recognizing the basic symptoms and encouraging a healthy lifestyle for all
All forms of media (TV, Radio, Print, and Social) will help with the awareness. Currently very little is being done through them.

In lieu of this we at the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community hope to partner with individuals and organizations who see a need to propose and effect change in the Nigeria Healthcare system towards adequate Diabetes Care.
Thanks to all our Nigerian participants and our international friends who graced the meeting and also participated through great ideas and suggestions.